A Modest Proposal for eDiscovery Education in Law Schools

A Modest Proposal for eDiscovery Education in Law Schools

A Modest Proposal for eDiscovery Education in Law Schools 150 150 Rakesh Madhava

Over the years, eDiscovery pundits and analysts have suggested that there’s a generational gap in eDiscovery. They say the reason the legal community was slow to respond to the challenges of digital data in discovery was that the partners and lead litigators graduated law school before computers were common. The thinking is that the new generation, raised with computers and educated in eDiscovery case law, will be prepared to manage electronic records in litigation.
Given that conventional wisdom, this Above the Law piece from last week was surprising. Michigan State Law Professor Adam Candeub introduced a new eDiscovery course to his students, promoting it as the first of its kind. The tipster who forwarded the course listing to Above the Law lamented her alma mater would offer such a frivolous course. “I love my alma mater, but a class on e-discovery? Is this really what the legal profession has come to?” Even more, in the unscientific poll question published with the blog post, 82 percent of the respondents answered the question “Should law schools teach classes about electronic discovery?” with “Yes. It sucks, but you have to know it.”
eDiscovery review can suck. But given that eDiscovery is an integral part of litigation, it was surprising  that there’s so much resistance and disdain for this type of education in law schools. This week, Above the Law received a letter signed by fourteen attorneys, including one state judge, pointing out that there are in fact “over a dozen law schools that offer eDiscovery as a stand-alone course.” They concluded by arguing that “a law school does its students a great service by offering a course an eDiscovery.”
Nextpoint’s Proposal for Law Schools
Nextpoint agrees with these prominent attorneys that eDiscovery is an important part of a legal education today. Which is why we have an offer for any accredited law school teaching eDiscovery. Nextpoint will provide our technology platform at a deeply discounted or pro bono basis for any school looking to provide students with real-world, hands on eDiscovery training. Our services run from archiving and preservation for social media and websites (Cloud Preservation), a complete eDiscovery review platform (Discovery Cloud), and evidence management and presentation for trial (Trial Cloud). We have the same standing offer for law firms offering gratis legal help for pro bono clients. If you fit one of these descriptions, please contact us. We’d like to help students see eDiscovery doesn’t have to suck.